Board of Directors

Mr. Phillip W. Evans, President

Durham, NC
Phil is an attorney in private practice concentrating on juvenile and mental health law in Durham, NC. Previously he was a park ranger historian at the Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, where he received the Freeman Tilden Award for education and interpretation from the National Parks and Conservation Association.

 

Dr. Eric Klingelhofer, Vice President for Research

Macon, GA
Eric is a retired professor of history at Mercer University. He was a senior archaeologist during the Colonial Williamsburg excavations under Ivor Noel Hume at the 1619 Wolstenholme Town site at Carter’s Grove Plantation near Williamsburg, VA. He has not only worked at Roanoke Island since the early 1990s, but has led archaeological research efforts at sites related to Sir Walter Raleigh in both Ireland and the Caribbean.

 

Mr. Nicholas M. Luccketti, Vice President for Research

Williamsburg, VA
Nick is one of the principals of the James River Institute for Archaeology. He has led numerous archaeological research efforts focusing on the early history of Virginia. In addition to working at Roanoke Island since the early 1990s, Nick was one of the “rediscoverers” of the 1607 Jamestown fort and the nearby Paspahegh Indian village.

 

Mr. Robert E. Davis, Secretary

Washington, DC
Bob is a Washington businessman with a life long interest in history. His participation on other non-profit boards brings his valuable experience to the First Colony Foundation. He combines his experience with his enthusiasm and thoughtful guidance.Bob is a Washington businessman (real estate) with a life-long interest in history. His participation on other non-profit boards brings his valuable experience to the First Colony Foundation. He combines his experience with his enthusiasm and thoughtful guidance.

 

Mr. Alastair Macdonald, Treasurer

Williamsburg, VA
Ale has a bachelors degree in Commerce from the University of Virginia and a masters degree in Finance from the University of Richmond along with a life-long interest in history. He received his training in archaeology at Colonial Williamsburg. A Virginian of long lineage and a board member of the James River Association, he participates regularly in archaeological fieldwork at Roanoke Island and Site X.

 

Other Members of the Board

Dr. James Horn

Richmond, VA
Jim is President and Chief Officer of the Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation. Jim is the author of “A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke” and “A Land as God Made It: Jamestown and the Birth of America.”

 

Ms. lebame houston

Manteo, NC
lebame is a Roanoke Island native with a life-long love of the story of the Lost Colony. She is the author/director of a stage production on the life of Queen Elizabeth I titled “Elizabeth R.” She is the historian of the Roanoke Island Historical Association, which produces the outdoor drama “The Lost Colony.”

Mrs. Betty Ray McCain

Wilson, NC
Betty McCain is the former Secretary of Cultural Resources for the State of North Carolina. She is a life-long and enthusiastic advocate for cultural resources and the arts. Betty is a former member of the Board of Governors for the University of North Carolina, the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees, and Chair of the North Carolina Democratic Party.

Dr. Gordon P. Watts, Jr.

Washington, NC
Retired from developing and teaching at East Carolina University’s Program in Maritime History and Underwater Archaeology, Gordon now directs the Institute for International Maritime Research. He was at the forefront of identifying the sunken remains of the ironclad USS Monitor off Cape Hatteras and Confederate commerce raider CSS Alabama off the coast of France. He was North Carolina’s first underwater archaeologist.

Mr. J. Eric Deetz

Chapel Hill, NC
An original cast member of the PBS series Time Team America and now a lecturer at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, Eric has 25 years of archaeological experience on 17th century sites such as Flowerdew Hundred and Jamestown in Virginia as well as in New England. In fact he grew up with historical archaeology as his father was the eminent American archaeologist James Deetz.